Fr. Gould’s Updates for St. Francis de Sales

April 6, 2020

Good morning, Good morning,

To view the live stream Mass, visit https://vimeo.com/event/31282/videos/404384579

The sacramental schedule for Holy Week.
Monday-Wednesday Mass Schedule. 6:30 and 8:00 AM
Monday-Wednesday Adoration Hours. 3-7 PM.
Holy Thursday Liturgy: 7:00 PM (No Adoration) (No 6:30 and 8:00 AM Masses)
Good Friday. Stations 3:00 PM (No Adoration) (No 6:30 and 8:00 AM Masses)
Good Friday Evening Liturgy: 7:00 PM
Easter Vigil: 8:30 PM (No Adoration)
Easter Sunday: 8:30 and 10:30 AM (No Adoration)

Confessions:
Holy Week: Monday thru Wednesday 12:00 and 7:00 PM
Thursday 12:00 PM
Friday 10:30, For Senior Citizens on Back Patio. 12:00 PM
Saturday: 12:00 PM


Internet Schedule
Morning Prayer: 7:30 AM
Evening Prayer: 5:00 PM
Rosary. 8:30 PM
Night Prayer: 9:00 PM
Please dial in on the internet and join us for Mass, Liturgy of the Hours, and rosary.

Here is the link for the liturgies and rosary: https://www.gotomeet.me/StFrancisdeSales/mass-liturgyofthehours
Here is the link for the Liturgy of the Hours:
http://www.ibreviary.org/en/tools/ibreviary-web.html


Reminder of the Coming of the Divine Mercy Novena, followed by Divine Mercy Sunday.
Starting the Friday, across the planet the Church will celebrate the annual novena to the Divine Mercy. I have asked Bill and Connie Talamantes to lead the devotion each day at the three o’clock hour. You can catch them on the Vimeo Internet channel. I have joined them a few times in the church during vocal prayers each afternoon at 3:00 PM. For the neophytes to this very popular devotion I leave you with a few resources for your understanding. I will be happy to offer the Divine Mercy Celebration at 2:00 on Divine Mercy Sunday.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaplet_of_the_Divine_Mercy
https://www.thedivinemercy.org/message/devotions/pray-the-chaplet


Allow for a day on the controversies that impact a people locked down by a pandemic.
Many years ago I served as the chaplain for the National Catholic Medical Association, CMA. It was and is a very good group that promotes the Catholic identity in medicine. I highly recommend it for the doctors in our parish. https://www.cathmed.org/.

Nineteen years ago I was involved in the CMA task force that was called together to compose a statement on the challenges of same sex attraction for individuals and their families. The members of the task force involved Psychiatrists, doctors, and one theologian from across the country. The statement produced by the task force was called, “Homosexuality and Hope.” Please note it was written with some sensitivity for the family members as well as individuals caught in the SSA. I recommend it for all. https://virtueonline.org/homosexuality-and-hope-statement-catholic-medical-association
Following the success on the Homosexuality and Hope Statement I suggested the formation of a task force on the problem of Pornography. Unfortunately, there was little response in dealing with the topic. I surmised at that time, people were not sure how to adequately address the problem. It had a deviant twist that impacted individuals physiologically as well as socially, and emotionally. It twisted folks spiritually and sacramentally. It blinded them to their moral duties in life and destroyed their marriages and ability to relate to people of the opposite sex. There were plenty of statistics on the problem that involved men and women of all ages, very young and old. Heterosexuals as well as members of the homosexual community. Married, single… and religious leaders. It covered all religions and cultic gatherings from across the planet. The problem continues to grow… especially among women.
To their credit, the Chinese figured out how to filter pornography out from the internet. Some of our local folks, quite close to home have been addressing the problem with advanced computer filter programs as well as counseling programs. Good things are being done.

And now the rest of the story. The reason I offered the story of the Jesuit martyrs of Virginia in yesterday’s letter was to draw an analogy to the topic of pornography in today’s letter. As the missionaries stepped into a completely non-Christian environment in 16th century Virginia that would meet them with hostility, we, more and more, find ourselves stepping into a non-Christian environment as our contemporary society is bound in materialism and narcissism, nourished on the concepts of entitlement and choice, finds little respect for religion and Judeo-Christian morals. We are ripe for martyrdom in the age of contraception, abortion, and pornography.
Let us not be confused by the apparent silence on the maladies of pornography two American Bishops, years ago wrote very good pastoral letters on their concerns for the innocence of their people, priests and laity alike. Bishop Paul S. Loverde and Bishop Robert Finn. The statements are very well done.
Bishop Paul S. Loverde https://www.arlingtondiocese.org/find-support/anti-pornography/
Bishop Robert Finn: Blessed are the Pure in Heart
Today the topic of pornography was addressed by the website, Church Militant. Why? Because they can see a society locked into their homes by a pandemic can be approached by insidious forces of evil through the internet. Yes, little Virginia, it is influenced by the demonic forces that can carve up hearts and souls in marriage and beyond. I recommend these for your review… but, please, not for the children.
https://www.churchmilitant.com/video/episode/vortex-souls-trapped-by-porn
https://www.churchmilitant.com/video/episode/micd-the-porn-industry

Let us pray for one another.




April 5,

Good evening, Good evening,

I am behind the late curve this night. Let’s get to the important facts. The sacramental schedule for Holy Week.

Monday-Wednesday Mass Schedule. 6:30 and 8:00 AM
Monday-Wednesday Adoration Hours. 3-7 PM.
Holy Thursday Liturgy: 7:00 PM (No Adoration) (No 6:30 and 8:00 AM Masses)
Good Friday. Stations 3:00 PM (No Adoration) (No 6:30 and 8:00 AM Masses)
Good Friday Evening Liturgy: 7:00 PM
Easter Vigil: 8:30 PM (No Adoration)
Easter Sunday: 8:30 and 10:30 AM (No Adoration)

Confessions:
Holy Week: Monday thru Wednesday 12:00 and 7:00 PM
Thursday 12:00 PM
Friday 10:30, For Senior Citizens on Back Patio. 12:00 PM
Saturday: 12:00 PM


Internet Schedule
Morning Prayer: 7:30 AM
Evening Prayer: 5:00 PM
Rosary. 8:30 PM
Night Prayer: 9:00 PM
Please dial in on the internet and join us for Mass, Liturgy of the Hours, and rosary.

Here is the link for the liturgies and rosary: https://www.gotomeet.me/StFrancisdeSales/mass-liturgyofthehours
Here is the link for the Liturgy of the Hours:
http://www.ibreviary.org/en/tools/ibreviary-web.html

As always, this begging priest asks your indulgence in your parish donations. You can send them through the mail, slide them under the sacristy door, or sign up for donating online. If you choose the last please seek the following website to guide you. https://saintfrancisparish.org/parish-giving/

God bless you. We need every dime we can get. God bless you.


Story of the Day

There are actually three stories to tell. The first is listed below. As the hour is late I don’t pretend to serve as the right one to deliver the story of the early Jesuit Martyrs in Virginia, so I give you the source from the internet… it’s a good story. What is better follows…. The rest of the story.

The second story focuses on the set of martyrs arrived in the district of Stafford, Virginia… below the current Quantico Marine Base. It was the time when priests were not welcome in Virginia. More on that anon.

The final story, set for another day, deals with the encroachment of Northern Indian Tribes, from the New York/Canada area, upon the Indians of the Shenandoah Valley. They terrorized the Indians of Virginia. It was the French Trappers who assisted the Indians of Virginia.

On September 10, 1570, eight Jesuits, two priests, three brothers and three novice brothers, arrived in Ajacan, on the banks of the James River accompanied by a Spanish boy and an Indian guide. They were led by Fr. Juan Baptista de Segura. The Jesuits were there to establish a mission to evangelize the local native population, the Algonkians. Because their goal was entirely evangelical, they brought no soldiers with them, as soldiers often were aggressive and led to tensions with the Indians. Thirty-seven years before the founding of Jamestown in 1607, this was the first European settlement in Virginia.
The Jesuits put great trust in their Indian guide – perhaps too much trust. His name was Don Luis. He had been rescued at sea by Spaniards years before and brought back to Spain. He was given an education in the Catholic faith and in Spanish ways. Don Luis claimed that his father was an important chief in Virginia who could provide the missionaries with food and supplies. As such, the Jesuits relied on his supposed connections and brought few supplies with them.
Unfortunately for the missionaries, Don Luis became anxious on his return to his native home and abandoned his Spanish ways and the Jesuits to live with his uncle at a local village. The Jesuits who had depended on him were now in desperate straights. As it was, the locals were suffering the consequences of a severe drought and, barely getting by themselves, had little in the way of food and supplies to share with the earnest if naive missionaries.
Even still, the Jesuits persevered, setting up their mission, St. Mary’s, and opening a school for native boys and a chapel for Mass. The three novices made their professions as Jesuits, the first such religious professions in what is now the United States.
Fr. Segura received word that Don Luis had abandoned his Christian faith in favor of polygamy and dissolute living. Fr. Segura sent messages to Don Luis petitioning his return to the faith, all in vain. At last, he decided to send three of his small band to the village to confront Don Luis personally. Fr. Luis Quiros and Brothers Gabriel and Juan arrived at the village and were graciously welcomed. They spoke with Don Luis, who gave his word to return to the mission the next day. The party left the next day, February 4, 1571, to return to the mission. Tragically, Don Luis and his warriors met them on the road and killed all three.
Four days later, February 9, 1571, Don Luis arrived at the mission with his warriors. Fr. Segura was very concerned about the three who had not returned. Don Luis assured Fr. Segura that he was there to help, and he was received by the Jesuits with open arms and forgiveness. Feigning a plan to cut firewood, the Indian warriors were given access to the storeroom of the mission where the axes were kept. Once they procured the axes, however, they attacked Fr. Segura and the other Jesuits, killing all of them except the boy, Alonso de Olmos, who was adopted by the tribe.
Months later, a Spanish supply ship arrived on the James River and the captain became suspicious when he found Indians dressed in Jesuit cassocks. The Spaniards took some of the Indians prisoner and learned from them of the deaths of the Jesuits and the capture of Alonso de Olmos. The next year, 1572, Spaniards from Florida arrived in Virginia seeking justice for the crime. They arrested the Indian chief along with several others implicated in the murders, demanding that Alonso be released and Don Luis turned over to their custody. Alonso managed to escape before he could be released, however, and made his way to the Spanish ship. Don Luis also escaped, fleeing into the wilderness where he was never heard from again. The Spanish governor was not satisfied with this outcome, and he condemned the Indian prisoners. Some were released, but seven were hanged as punishment for the murder of Fr. Segura and his companions.
https://thoughtsandprayersforthefaithful.wordpress.com/2017/02/10/sanctity-in-america-the-jesuit-martyrs-of-virginia-servants-of-god/

And now, as Paul Harvey would say, “The rest of the story.” The stories for the martyrdom of the Spanish martyrs in America were not exclusive to the Jesuits alone. The Franciscans also had their confrers lost to the Indians. The movement Northward for the Spanish would shift to the West… to California. Ah consider the 21 Spanish/Franciscan missions of California, initiated in 1779. Each twenty-two miles apart, a day’s walk for the safety and security of the friars trying to evangelize the Indian tribes of the West Coast. Who knows, if there were no Spanish Jesuit martyrs in Virginia the Franciscans would probably have stayed to the East and one future saint of famous brown robes, Junipero Serra, may have been a saint for Virginia. In their departure to the West the balance of power in the East would fall to the French and English. Not a good balance.

Good night. Let us pray for one another.




Saturday, April 4

Good afternoon, Good afternoon,

Our Grand Knight for the Knights of Columbus, Scott Grimard, yesterday informed me that The Loudoun Medical Group has established a testing tent in the parking lot of the LMG Cornwall Urgent Care center at 211 Gibson St. in Leesburg.  The hours are
10 AM – 4 PM on Weekdays.  Call 800-232-4636. Appointments can be made in ten minute intervals.  If you think you may have the Coronavirus, or been exposed to it you should go to this site.  I leave you with an article in the paper.  https://loudounnow.com/2020/03/23/loudoun-medical-group-opens-drive-through-covid-19-testing/


As we are racing into this Season of Holy Week/Easter allow a moment for the schedule announcements.

MASS, LITURGY OF THE HOURS, AND ROSARY 
Join us via live streaming for all Masses: CLICK HERE
Join us via live streaming of the Liturgy of the Hours and Rosary: CLICK HERE

The priests and seminarians will be Live Streaming the Liturgies with the following schedule:
(All Confessions are heard in the Catholic Education Center)


HOLY WEEK
Palm Sunday
Mass Times – 8:30 AM and 10:30 AM
Confessions – 12 PM and 7 PM
Adoration – 3 PM – 7 PM

 

Monday of Holy Week
Mass Times – 6:30 AM and 8 AM
Confessions – 12 PM and 7 PM
Adoration – 3 PM – 7 PM

Morning Prayer – 7:30 AM
Evening Prayer – 5 PM
Rosary – 8:30 PM
Night Prayer – 9 PM

 

Tuesday of Holy Week
Mass Times – 6:30 AM and 8 AM
Confessions – 12 PM and 7 PM
Adoration – 3 PM – 7 PM

Morning Prayer – 7:30 AM
Evening Prayer – 5 PM
Rosary – 8:30 PM
Night Prayer – 9 PM

 

Wednesday of Holy Week
Mass Times – 6:30 AM and 8 AM
Confessions – 12 PM and 7 PM
Adoration – 3 PM – 7 PM

Morning Prayer – 7:30 AM
Evening Prayer – 5 PM
Rosary – 8:30 PM
Night Prayer – 9 PM

 

For a text of the Psalms, Readings, and Prayers for the Liturgy of the Hours, CLICK HERE
For a music aid for Night Prayer, CLICK HERE
Liturgia de Las Horas  Liturgy of the Hours in Spanish

 

TRIDUUM
Holy Thursday
Mass of the Lord’s Supper – 7 PM
Confessions – 12 PM
No Adoration

Good Friday of the Lord’s Passion
Stations of the Cross – 3 PM
Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion – 7 PM
Confessions – 12 PM
No Adoration

Holy Saturday
Easter Vigil – 8:30 PM
Confessions – 12 PM
No Adoration

Easter Sunday
Mass Time 8:30 AM and 10:30 AM
Confessions 12 PM
Adoration – 3 PM – 7 PM

 


 

There are all sorts of rumors running fast and loose on what the Diocese is doing, used to do, should do, and/or doesn’t have a clue what to do in Holy Week. Enclosed are the directives I just received today.  I offer it to you so we are all on the same page.

Dear Brother Priests,

Along with Bishop Burbidge, I assure you of my thoughts and prayers as we enter into our celebration of Holy Week during this challenging time.  The Bishop and I greatly appreciate your respectful collaboration and cooperation with his directives.  Many of our diocesan parishioners have expressed their gratitude for the efforts of many of our priests to live stream and use social media to be present to them while the “stay at home” order is in effect.  As we begin to enter this most sacred time with our private liturgical celebrations, I offer the reminders of what the Bishop has requested below:

  • that no “drive-thru” distribution of Holy Communion take place;
  • that palms are not to be distributed this year, even by leaving blessed palms available for pick-up after the liturgy;
  • that during the Triduum:
    • the church should be locked during the celebration of the liturgies and that the 10-person maximum is to be observed (this includes priests, deacons, organists, seminarians, etc.);
    • liturgies may be live-streamed but not pre-recorded so that the faithful can unite in prayer to the liturgy while it is being celebrated at the time required by liturgical law. The live-stream may recorded and made available for re-viewing on the website, social media platform, etc., after the original live-stream has concluded;
    • on Good Friday, a special intercession is to be added after “X. For those in Tribulation.”  This intercession is now provided to you in Spanish (attached).

Also, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments promulgated a decree for a Mass in Time of Pandemicearlier this week.  Please find attached the decree, Mass prayers and readings (in English, Spanish, and Latin). This Mass is classified as a “Mass for Various Needs and Occasions.” Bishop Burbidge has already given permission for the celebration of a Mass for Various Needs on Weekdays during Lent. Therefore, this Mass may be celebrated today and tomorrow (4/3 and 4/4).

  • As noted in the decree, this Mass is not permitted on Palm Sunday (4/5), the weekdays of Holy Week (4/6-11), the Octave of Easter (4/12-19), and Sundays of Easter (4/26, 5/3, etc.), as well as other major Sundays and Solemnities (St Mark 4/25, etc.).
  • This Mass is permitted, at the discretion of the Pastor or Priest celebrant, on weekdays of Easter (4/20-24, 4/27-5/2, etc.)

Fraternally in Christ,


Next week, across the planet the Church will celebrate the annual novena to the Divine Mercy.  I have asked Bill and Connie Talamantes to lead the devotion each day at the three o’clock hour.  You can catch them on the Vimeo Internet channel.  I have joined them a few times in the church during vocal prayers each afternoon at 3 PM. For the neophytes to this very popular devotion I leave you with a few resources for your understanding.  I will be happy to offer the Divine Mercy Celebration at 2 PM on Divine Mercy Sunday.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaplet_of_the_Divine_Mercy

https://www.thedivinemercy.org/message/devotions/pray-the-chaplet

Reminder:  I will hear Confessions at 10:30 AM on Friday Morning for the seniors of the parish.  Just like this past Friday, I will hear Confessions on the patio behind the school building.  For convenience you should park behind the gymnasium.  God bless one and all.

My mother once told me the story of St. Bernard having an apparition with the Lord.  Jesus said the greatest physical pain endured that day called “Good,” other than the nails and thorns… I presume, was on his left shoulder.  The left shoulder?  As it happened, Christ entered thru the Southern Gate on the Western side of the Temple. As he walked Northward, hefting the Cross he past the Temple as they were sacrificing the sheep for Passover.  He, the True Lamb of God, could see, hear, and smell the commotion taking place at the Temple on his right.  The cross would have to be on his left shoulder so he could look upon the temple as he passed it.

For a context of distance from Calvary to the Temple was the distance from our Cross at the end of the road to the Fire House on the other side of Route 7.

In closing, tomorrow we enter the week we call, “Holy.”  Let us pray for the poor people caught up in the Coronavirus, especially those who may die with the dreaded disease this week.  Let us pray for those who are serving in harm’s way for our health and wellbeing.   Most especially, those serving in the police department, sheriff’s office, and the young ones in the fire department.  Let us pray for the doctors, nurses, and med techs.  Let us remember the president and our governor in our prayers.  None of them asked for any of this but are doing a good job holding things together.

And please know.  I do worry for all of you who are locked down in your homes as we enter our third week, standing back from the virus.  It is a very difficult time and I know there is no small amount of stress experienced by many in the parish. May the Blessed Mother hold you close and angels protect you.  Please know I am very proud of you in example of Faith and Devotion.  Let us pray for one another.

 




 

April 3, 2020

Good morning, Good morning,

Attached is the monthly update, from the diocese to the pastors, on the Annual Diocesan Bishops Lenten Appeal. Please click here for report. It also includes an insight on how our parish is doing in the appeal. God bless the many folks that have given to the appeal thus far and many prayers for others to join them that we may reach our expected goal.  If you do not have a diocesan appeal card you can simply place check the money of check in an envelope and the office secretary will submit it for you.

Again, please allow my begging for the needs of the parish.  Thus far in our yearly financial reports of the parish we are down two hundred thousand dollars from last year’s collections.  That is due in part because one individual last year added one hundred thousand dollars from his own pocket for the parish.  Absent that generosity we would now be one hundred thousand dollars down from last year.  Please know, I am grateful for all you are doing but we need everyone on board to safeguard the needs of both parish and staff of the parish. I appreciate your mailing in your envelopes and sliding envelopes under the sacristy door.  And many thanks for signing up for the electronic giving.  For those who would like to join the electronic giving program: saintfrancisparish.org/parish-giving/  God love you… and so do I.

Please know, even though we are locked in our homes it doesn’t mean we need to be locked out from the ”Easter Basket” celebration.  Enclosed below is the recommended format for foods in the basket.  I suggest you swing by the church and bring a bottle to fill with holy water so you can bless your basket at home.  And when you have your great family feasts you might send a picture to either Fr. Heisler or myself so we can enjoy a smile from a distance.  (frgould@gmail.com) (jfheisler@gmail.com).  Yes, I think it will be nice to see the great festivities around the parish. God bless one and all.

www.learnreligions.com/traditional-easter-basket-for-blessing-4161079

The Parish Letter today honors of the many cooks/bakers of the parish.  As a point of trivia there are three culinary delights commonly consumed, if not celebrated, in America that have been impacted by the historical life of the Church.  None of them are Irish or German… I am sorry.  Ha! Ha! Ha!  Enclosed are the tasty treats.

 

First, Hot Cross Buns.  The hot cross bun, common to the end of Lent, marks the crucifixion of Christ. And, since the bun is spiced, it reminds us of the myrrh, used in the burial of Christ.  Historically, the hot cross bun dates to the 14th century at St. Alban’s Monastery in England.  It was thought to have medicinal benefits and was ruled by the crown to only be used at Christmas, Good Friday, and Funerals.  Why the restriction?  The crown had its own superstition that if the mystery of the hot cross bun was abused bad luck would befall the community where the abuse took place.  It was also a source of blessing for sailors that helped prevent both illness and ship wreck.

 

Second, The Croissant.  It represented the Christian victory in the defense of the Austrian City, Vienna, in 1683.  The Polish leader John Sobieski, under the Holy Roman Emperor, defeated the encroaching Ottomans, who were Islamic.  The croissant was designed around the Crescent Moon, as featured on the Islamic flag.

 

Third.  The pretzel.  Legend has it that the pretzel was invented by an Italian monk in the year 610 A.D. to reward young children for learning their prayers.  He supposedly folded strips of bread dough to resemble the crossed arms of praying children. He called his creation pretiola, which meant “little rewards.”

 

Now, let’s be serious, the pretzel in Italy was most likely a cultural and culinary failure in a land that loves it’s… wine.  It took the Goths, who inundated the Italian peninsula at the time to take the pretzel home for the complimentary… beer.  In the Germanic countries the cultural and culinary facets were thus wed both permanently… and happily.

Now, departing the business of food, I want to focus on one of the greatest icons to affect the spiritual life of Catholics in America.  It involves a painting titled, “Madonna of the Streets.” No other art piece has been the object of such expanding urban legends.  The title itself was initiated at Ellis Island in New York when the multiple immigrants attached to it a Marian Theme.  There are several constants in the many stories on the painting.  The identity of the Artist:  Roberto Ferruzzi.  Original title of the painting, “Madonnina,” (Little Mother).  Time of the painting, circa 1895. Location of the scene: Venice, Italy.  Tragedy: Father and Mother move to America.  Early Death of the Father, Mother’s Nervous Breakdown. Ten children sent to orphanages. One daughter becomes a religious and ultimately meets her maternal aunts in Venice. The mystery is explained.  (Allow two options in the story)

In the first version the parents escape a revolution in Italy and move to New York.  They have a large family, with ten children.  The father dies in an accident while working in a trolley car barn in New York.  The mother is sent to a sanitarium and children to orphanages.  One child become a “Dominican Nun.”  On her seventy-fifth birthday the order sends her home to Venice, Italy to see the home of her parents.  She met her aunt and the aunt brought her in for tea.  She admired the painting of the “Madonna of the Street” located on the living room wall.  Her aunt indicated that her mother was the young girl carrying her brother through the cold street one evening.  The scene inspired the artist.  And the rest is history.

In the second version the family simply leaves Italy, without impetus.  There was no apparent threat from which to flee.  The couple moved to Oakland, California in 1906 and sets up both family and home.  They had ten children.  In 1927 the husband died of influenza.  Mother suffers a nervous breakdown and is institutionalized while children are sent to the orphanages.  The sixth daughter influenced by the Josephine order of religious who taught her in early grammar school.  With that influence she entered the convent using her mother’s name for her religious name.  She would eventually return to Venice, Italy and meet her two aunts and hear of the “Madonna of the Streets.”  The aunts presumed the parents had died young as no one bothered to write home and speak of the family. The aunts did not necessarily like the title “Madonna of the Streets” because it implied prostitution.  And currently, the family is still trying to find the original painting, lost to the world of secret art collectors.  Please read the fully story below, printed by the Franciscan Media.  It is a good story.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/the-true-story-behind-madonnina/

Let us pray for one another.

 




Click links for Fr. Gould’s previous emails to the parish

Thursday, April 2

Wednesday, April 1

Tuesday, March 31

Monday, March 30

Sunday, March 29

Saturday, March 28

Friday, March 27 – evening

Friday, March 27 – morning

Thursday, March 26

Wednesday, March 25

Tuesday, March 24

Monday, March 23

Sunday, March 22

Saturday, March 21

Friday, March 20 – Evening – Confessions

Friday, March 20 – Morning

Thursday March 19 – Solemnity of St. Joseph

Wednesday, March 18 – Adoration

Tuesday, March 17 – New Schedules

Monday, March 16

 

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